Tag Archives: 19th century

My 1st 10mm Franco-Prussian War miniatures

From L-R: French Infantry, French Command (3 figures), Turco, Zouave, Jäger

I took a wild punt on a job lot of Franco-Prussian figures from Chariot Miniatures the other day. I wasn’t really sure what I’d be getting, but I thought it might be a good way to get started with the FPW, as regardless of what I got, it would be something that I could build from. I mean, I’m going to need lots of everything really. Though I’m not going to rush in to all the Prussian allied states *just* yet!

After a bit of internet sleuthing it seems that Chariot Miniatures are no longer trading and their FPW range may have been acquired by Magister Militum. Certainly some of the sculpts and catalogue numbers are similar. So that’ll be handy if I want to top up any of the units in the same style. Though it does look like some of the packs aren’t available on the MM website. I assume they’ve combined certain packs eg the command and the line infantry. Also the Chariot packs have 12 infantry and 6 cavalry, as opposed to Magister’s 30 infantry and 12 cavalry.

From L-R: French Hussar, French Cuirassier

There is a Chariot Miniatures website still partially accessible courtesy of the Internet Archive, however their Franco-Prussian War page is sadly absent. So for the benefit of anyone who is trying to find out any information about their FPW range here’s as much info as I’ve managed to work out.

  • SFE1: French infantry
  • SFE2: French infantry command (4 officers, 4 standard bearers and 4 drummers)
  • SFE3: French Turcos
  • SFE5: French Zouaves (with turbans)
  • SFE10: French Hussars
  • SFE12: French Cuirassiers
  • PUG3: Prussian Jägers

Anyhoo, these are the first 10mm figures that I’ve seen close at hand, and I must say I’m amazed at the detail in such small miniatures. They’re quite remarkable! I’m looking forward to picking up some Pendraken 10mm next to see how they compare.

Paper soldiers galore!

With thoughts of playing a greater variety of wargames but with less investment in figures, time and storage space, I’ve come round to the notion of using paper miniatures. At the very least, they allow you to try out a game relatively quickly after reading it, to help you decide whether or not you want to pursue a project before it even begins.

I was rather delighted to see that an artist called Vyacheslav Batalov has released some magnificent paper miniatures for 19th century Central Asia on Wargame Vault. I have the two sets pictured above and they are beautifully illustrated. Vyacheslav has since released Afghan Tribesmen, Afghan Regulars and two sets of Indian Army figures – the first of which includes Gurkhas (set 1 and set 2).

Alternatively you can get hordes of paper miniatures for free from the Junior General website.

Franco-Prussian War resources update

Whilst trawling through old issues of Wargames Illustrated, I stumbled across a set of wargames rules for the Franco-Prussian and the Russo-Turkish wars. The memorably-named Schlachtenbummler (it translates as “away supporter / fan”), by Richard Brooks, clocks in at only 4 pages long, and can be found in Wargames Illustrated #5.

I’ve updated the earlier post on Franco-Prussian War resources, to include this omission. That post also includes details of how to get hold of WI back issues.

Franco-Prussian War resources

The wargaming butterfly strikes again! I seem to have found myself exploring the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) of all things. As luck would have it, I actually had the Wargames Illustrated FPW special (#313) secreted on the bookshelf waiting for this special day.

But WI being WI, they’ve covered this conflict many times over the years. A bit of digging later, and I unearthed a treasure trove of FPW articles. They too, can be yours. Simply get a WI Prime membership and search in The Vault on their website. Membership only costs £1 for the first month.

I’ve listed the issue numbers below with some explanatory blurb where the subject wasn’t clear from the article title.

Do let me know if I’ve missed any!

  • 002: 25mm Franco-Prussian Wargaming (Matthew Hawkins)
  • 004: Reflections on Firepower in the Franco-Prussian War (Peter Dennis)
  • 005: Schlachtenbummler (Richard Brooks)
  • 010: Rules for the Use of the Prussian Artillery 1870-71 (Martin Tomczak)
  • 014: Organisation and Equipment of the Prussian Artillery 1870-71 (Martin Tomczak)
  • 017: French Colonial Troops and the Franco-Prussian War (Stephen Shann)
  • 063: St Jerôme – A Franco-Prussian Battle by Phone
  • 063: Back To Basics V – Writing Scenarios (Richard Clarke)
  • 064: Back To Basics VI – Campaigns (Richard Clarke)
  • 065: They Died For Glory – A Review (Richard Clarke)
  • 075: Franco-Prussian War Scenarios (G.J. Kennerley)
  • 080: Franco-Prussian War Naval Lists (Andrew Barrow)
  • 080: “A Berlin!” – Rules for refighting actions from the Franco-German War 1870-1871 (Philip Robinson)
  • 083: The Mitrailleuse in the Franco-Prussian War (Steve Shann)
  • 083: 1866… and all that (Richard Clarke)
  • 084: Tactics in the Franco-Prussian War pt. 1 – French Tactical Doctrine (Mike Johnson)
  • 085: Tactics in the Franco-Prussian War pt. 2 – Prussian Tactical Doctrine (Mike Johnson)
  • 086: Tactics in the Franco-Prussian War pt. 3 – From Reality to Rules (Mike Johnson)
  • 106: Von Boltenstern & The Principles of War (Richard Clarke)
  • 169: Campaigns for Scenario Writers – The Franco-Prussian War (Jeff Fletcher)
  • 209: A Comedy of Errors – or How Not to Win a 19th Century Battle (Mark Jones)
  • 237: The Battle of Artenay, 1870 (Adrian Martins)
  • 276: Polishing That Old Gem – Adapting The Battle of Froschwiller Worth to Black Powder (John Desch)
  • 313: Ah, Les Braves Gens – Wargaming the Franco-Prussian War (Gerard Miller)
  • 313: Dashed Hopes – The Battle of Wörth (David Tuck)
  • 313: Big Battle, Big Game – The Battle of Gravelotte-St Privat (David Marks)
  • 313: Franco-Prussian War Figure Round Up (Wayne Bollands)
  • 361: 1871 – Bruce Weigle’s Designer Notes

Pax Pamir arrives!

Oh my… What a work of art Pax Pamir is! Well worth the wait. It’s also suprisingly heavy. Probably because it’s packed to the gunnels with gaming goodness. Here’s some closeups of the coins which were a Kickstarter extra. I’m so glad I got these. They’ll definitely help create an atmosphere of intrigue.

Pax Pamir: The Great Game?

Thanks to The Men Who Would Be Kings I’ve developed an insatiable fascination for the North-West Frontier. Recently I’ve been compulsively reading Khyber by Charles Miller and have been thoroughly captivated by the farce, tragedy and international intrigue of the Great Game. Khyber’s sub-title in the front pages of the book is “The Story of an Imperial Migraine”… says it all really! I got my copy of Khyber for £2.78 and I would happily have paid ten times that for the riveting read. If you’re looking for an entertaining traverse through the NWF then do pick it up.

Anyhoo as luck would have it, I stumbled across Pax Pamir on Kickstarter. It’s a boardgame I’d never heard of before, but it looks like it captures the spirit of the shenanigans of the Great Game in Afghanistan. If this sounds like your bag, you can find out more about it here: